in-depth interview method

The In-depth Interview Method: 12 Articles on Design & Implementation

“The In-depth Interview MetThe In-depth Interview Methodhod: 12 Articles on Design & Implementation” is a new compilation that includes a selection of articles appearing in Research Design Review from 2012-2019 concerning the in-depth interview (IDI) method. There are certainly many other articles in RDR that are relevant to the IDI method — such as those having to do with various aspects of reflexivity, e.g., Reflections from the Field, and analysis, e.g., The Qualitative Analysis Trap, and narrative research, e.g., Navigating Narrative Research & the Depths of the Lived Experience — however, the 12 selected articles were chosen for their specific application to the IDI method. It is hoped that this brief text will be useful to the student, the teacher, and the researcher who is interested in furthering their consideration of a quality approach to designing and conducting IDIs.

“The In-depth Interview Method: 12 Articles on Design & Implementation” is available for download here.

A similar compilation devoted to the focus group method can be downloaded here.

Strengths & Limitations of the In-depth Interview Method: An Overview

The following is a modified excerpt from Applied Qualitative Research Design: A Total Quality Framework Approach (Roller & Lavrakas, 2015, pp. 56-57).

Strengths

The potential advantages or strengths of the in-depth interview (IDI) method reside in three key areas: (1) the interviewer–interviewee relationship, (2) the interview itself, and (3) the analytical component Two people talkingof the process. The relative closeness of the interviewer–interviewee relationship that is developed in the IDI method potentially increases the credibility of the data by reducing response biases (e.g., distortion in the outcomes due to responses that are considered socially acceptable, such as “I attend church weekly,” acquiescence [i.e., tendency to agree], and satisficing [i.e., providing an easy “don’t know” answer to avoid the extra cognitive burden to carefully think through what is being asked]) and nonresponse, while also increasing question–answer validity (i.e., the interviewee’s correct interpretation of the interviewer’s question).

An additional strength of the IDI method is the flexibility of the interview format, which allows the interviewer to tailor the order in which questions are asked, modify the question wording as appropriate, ask follow-up questions to clarify interviewees’ responses, and use indirect questions (e.g., the use of projective techniques) to stimulate subconscious opinions or recall. It should be noted, however, that “flexibility” does not mean a willy-nilly approach to interviewing, and, indeed, the interviewer should employ quality measures such as those outlined in “Applying a Quality Framework to the In-depth Interview Method.”

A third key strength of the IDI method—analyzability of the data—is a byproduct of the interviewer–interviewee relationship and the depth of interviewing techniques, which produce a granularity in the IDI data that is rich Read Full Text